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‘Barry Flanagan on Park Avenue’, 54th to 59th Street, New York (1995-1996)

This outdoor exhibition involved the installation of some of Flanagan’s later work – bronze hares – along Park Avenue. Flanagan is best known for these large bronzes which feature in public places across the world and which dominated the later part of his career. He exhibited a number of times in the US, including at the Museum of Modern Art and the Solomon R Guggenheim Museum, New York. 

Theme Tile info for when publishing

Title: ‘Barry Flanagan on Park Avenue’, 54th to 59th Street, New York (1995-1996)

Blurb: Explore materials relating to the outdoor exhibition on park avenue

Image: Copy of 1000×716 (78)

An exploration of links to the archive catalogue from this exhibition page brings to light different kinds of archival material. The photograph files show the installation process (JBF/3/8.20 & JBF/3/8.21). These dynamic, black and white images by Jessica Craig Martin show sculptures including Hare and Bell, 1988 and Hospitality, 1990 being hoisted, set down and unveiled. Additional related photograph files include those of AB Fine Art Foundry staff in New York (JBF/3/9.19). These images tell their own story; Flanagan took the group out to the US to see the works in situ. 

 

One of the richest sources in the archive are Flanagan’s writings, most of which can be found in the series called ‘Writings with related papers’ (JBF/1/2). These include notes on his thoughts, artist’s statements and drafts for correspondence, in addition to related papers including press cuttings. One such file (JBF/1/2.42) is linked to the Park Avenue exhibition. It contains notes on the hare as a chosen subject entitled ‘Why the Hare?’ and a biro drawing for an armature, alongside small photocopies of the aforementioned Park Avenue installation shots. This file, like many in the archive, is linked to other archive files in different series, but covering similar themes. Here one can navigate to a file of digital printed images in a series of source material for work (JBF/3/3/2.1) that includes additional documentation on the hare. A file of press cuttings, including reviews (JBF/5/1/2.3), also contains reference to the Park Avenue exhibition. From the early 1970s Flanagan accumulated reviews, alongside other press that took his interest, in loose files like this one.

Hospitality, 1990 is one of the artworks on exhibit at Park Avenue. Browsing onto the artwork page, the user is once more encouraged to delve back into the archive. A couple of correspondence files are referenced including (JBF/6/3/1.33), a file of letters on the gift and sale of work. In terms of images, not only can one see photographs of Hospitality, 1990 installed elsewhere, for instance in Knokke in Belgium (JBF/3/8.26), but also of work in progress at AB Fine Art Foundry in London (JBF/3/4/2.7). These show casts of the leaping hare alongside foundry machinery and staff. In bringing together these archive files, a photographic diary of the life of the artwork is compiled, backed by a network of information from written sources. One can navigate back to the archive catalogue and still understand this documentation in its archival context.

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